WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Brother of the Blade

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Brother of the Blade

As today is Memorial Day, a holiday in the United States instituted to remember the men and women who died while serving in the armed forces, the Word of the Week seemed to pick itself.

Richard Sharpe and His Chosen Men, from the ITV series Sharpe, by Bernard Cornwell.

Richard Sharpe and His Chosen Men, from the ITV series Sharpe, by Bernard Cornwell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brother of the Blade (noun)

Swordsman or soldier; a fellow soldier in a shared struggle.

Brothers at Dunkirk 1814, from War Against Napoleon, 2002.

Brothers at Dunkirk 1814, from War Against Napoleon, 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a news flash: No soldier gives his life. That’s not the way it works. Most soldiers who make a conscious decision to place themselves in harm’s way do it to protect their buddies. They do it because of the bonds of friendship – and it goes so much deeper than friendship.  ~ Eric Massa

In war the heroes always outnumber the soldiers ten to one.  ~ H.L. Mencken

Neither soldiers nor money can defend a king but only friends won by good deeds, merit, and honesty.  ~ Sallust

5 Things You Didn’t Know About The Hollywood Rules Series by Mel Curtis

5 things you didnt know about

 

 

 

The Hollywood Rules series by Mel Curtis

  1. Founded by Dooley Rule, the Dooley Foundation specializes in life coaching celebrities, athletes, and wealthy head-cases. Dooley’s approach was unorthodox, as was his record keeping – few know who his clients were, fewer are familiar with his methods.
  2. Now that he’s passed on, he’s left everything to his first three children contingent upon them working for the Foundation, meeting a sales quota, and fulfilling one of his unorthodox wishes (like having his son carry Dooley’s tea cup poodle everywhere).
  3. One of the Foundation’s biggest clients is the NBA expansion team – L.A. Flash. A team of misfits and rule-breakers themselves.
  4. The Rule children – their loves, their fashion, their mistakes – are a favorite topic of conversation with Hollywood’s hottest gossip columnist, Lyle Lincoln.
  5. The Rule children – Amber, Blue, and Cora – could use a bit of life coaching themselves!

Each book in the hot romantic comedy Hollywood Rules series stands alone. Book 3, Cora Rules, is now on sale in the Book Boyfriends Café Summer Lovin’ anthology (14 books & novellas for 99 cents). Cora is the wildest and youngest of Dooley’s heirs, and in this book she meets her match, Trent Parker, the L.A. Flash’s new coach, nicknamed the Reverend (for the worshipful way he approaches the game of basketball). Here’s an excerpt from Cora Rules.

SummerLovinBBC2

 Exes. Siblings. Love-struck clients who refused to sign divorce documents. Cora’s body was a bundle of tension in need of an outlet – a strong buzz, a deep tissue massage, sex. “Impossible.”

“Impossible is nothing.” A deep, rich voice with a swirling, Southern twang interrupted her thoughts. “We weren’t introduced earlier. I’m Trent Parker.”

The NBA’s newest coach was sexier up close. His body bigger. His whiskey-brown eyes more intense. His presence was a double shot of vodka and Red Bull that made her heart race, her lips curl upward, and her body blaze to life in ways it shouldn’t. Because he was the Reverend and that jacket of his was so very hideous.

“I’m Cora.” The rebellious streak notched up her smile to provocative. What was tee-totaling Coach Parker going to do? Call her bluff?

Damned if he didn’t.

That smile of his turned as crookedly mischievous as Archie’s. His eyes stroked and weighed and measured, like a lover trying to decide which part of her he’d consume first. Of their own accord, her nipples stood at attention, volunteering for the lead in a multi-course meal.

Cora blinked. She had to be reading him wrong. Coach Parker didn’t cuss. He didn’t create scandals. He hadn’t breathed a bad word about his failed marriage. This was not the kind of man interested in hot sex with a stranger.

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Readers of this blog will be sent a FREE romantic comedy short by signing up for Melinda’s book release email newsletter. Just click HERE!

 

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Melinda Curtis is an award winning, USA Today bestselling author. She writes the fun and sexy Hollywood Rules series, book 3 of which is featured in Book Boyfriends Café Summer Lovin’. Jayne Ann Krentz says of Blue Rules (Book 2): “Sharp,, sassy, modern version of a screwball comedy from Hollywood’s Golden Age except a lot hotter.”

Melinda also writes sweet romantic comedy (Bridesmaid series) and light-hearted sweet romances for Harlequin Heartwarming (Harmony Valley series). Brenda Novak says: “Season of Change has found a place on my keeper shelf.”

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WOW ~ Words of the Week ~ Show Me the Money!

WOW ~ Words of the Week ~ Show Me the Money!

one pound note bank of england

One Pound Note for the Bank of England, 16 July 1813

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week, there were just too many words from which to choose, so I decided to list them all! For your delectation, the generally vulgar terms for money.

Balsam

Bit (“He grappled the cull’s bit” i.e., he stole the gent’s money)

Blunt (cant)

Bunce

Bustle (cant)

Chink (for the noise it makes in one’s pocket)

Cly (cant, specifically money in a pocket; “he filed the cly” i.e., he picked the man’s pocket)

Cole (“post the cole” means pay down the money)

Coriander/Coriander Seeds

Crap/Crop (to “nim the crap” means to steal the money; to “wheedle the crap” means to coax money from someone)

Dimmock

Dues (money that is owed; “come, tip us the dues” means to pay up what’s owed)

Dust

Gelt (German origin)

Ginger-Bread

Goree (specifically gold)

Iron

Kelter

King’s Pictures

The "King's Pictures" of George IIII [IV] 1821

The “King’s Pictures” of George IIII [IV] 1821

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lour/Lowre

Lurries (moveable money such as rings or watches)

Mopusses

Muck

Plate (prize money)

Poney (chiefly for gambling; “post the poney” means to lay down the money)

Prey

Quids/Quidds (ready money, available to loan)

Rag

Recruits (money that is expected; “have you raised the recruits” means have you collected the money)

Rhino

Ribband

Ribbin (noun describing one who is wealthy; “the Ribbin runs schick/thick” means the gent has well-lined pockets; “the Ribbin runs thin” means the gent has little money on him)

Bank-notes,__paper-money,__French-alarmists,__o, the devil, the devil!__ah! poor John Bull!!! by James Gillray, 1797

Bank-notes,__paper-money,__French-alarmists,__o, the devil, the devil!__ah! poor John Bull!!! by James Gillray, 1797

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rouleau (guineas for the gaming tables, wrapped and rolled in paper in packs of 20-50, or sometimes in ivory boxes)

Round Sum

Spanish

Spanks/Spankers

Stake (booty won by gambling or acquired by robbery)

Stephen/Steven

Weeding Dues

 

So this week I plan to “Raise the Recruits” by “Wheedling the crap” from my husband, but as it’s the middle of the month and the “Ginger-Bread” has likely gone toward bills, I suspect the “Ribbin runs thin.”  Good Fortune as you pursue your own “Coriander Seeds.”

 

All definitions and/or examples taken from Online Etymological DictionaryCant: A Gentleman’s Guide, and/or 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

Regency Romance Turns 80

Regency Romance Turns 80

 

Regency Turns 80 ~ Celebrate with The Beau Monde

Regency Turns 80 ~ Celebrate with The Beau Monde

It’s hard to believe it, but Regency Romance is 80 years young in 2015!

The Regency itself was only nine years in length, from 1811-1820, spanning the time period when the Prince of Wales ruled in place of his incapacitated father, King George III.  The term Regency Era has come to mean a much broader time, however, covering the years 1795 (when King George III had his first “spell”) to as late as 1837 (the end of the reign of King William IV).

Regardless of whether you’re a strict constructionist or a “there can never be too many years defining the Regency” person, the impact of the period is undeniable.  An era so rich with changes in architecture, industry, economics, society, the arts, culture, fashion, and politics was destined to be an object of fascination.  Regency romances bring this time period to life!

The Beau Monde, the chapter of the Romance Writers of America that specializes in the Regency, is celebrating this eightieth anniversary by hosting a year-long commemoration of the woman who started it all: Georgette Heyer.  She wrote the first such romance, Regency Buck, way back in 1935, and a new genre was born.

Please join us in our celebration, and stop by The Beau Monde blog to share your comments, discover new authors, and reminisce with other devotees of the genre.  I will update the links at the bottom of this post as each new article is published.

Regency Romance Turns 80 Posts:

The Beau Monde Celebrates the 80th Anniversary of Regency Romance

Regency Buck

An Infamous Army

The Black Moth

The Spanish Bride

The Corinthian – reviewed by me!

The Transformation of Philip Jettan -or- Powder and Patch

Faro’s Daughter

These Old Shades

Friday’s Child

The Reluctant Widow

The Foundling

Arabella

The Masqueraders

The Grand Sophy

The Quiet Gentleman

well written books too short jane austen 

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Cascade

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Cascade

Since last week was all about being disguised, aka drunk, this week naturally lent itself to the after effects of said drunkenness: getting sick.  I am one who would rather visit the dentist every day for a month than throw up.  When I was a child, I even avoided using medical terms for the action, almost superstitiously believing if I didn’t say the actual word out loud, maybe I would avoid the unpleasant results.  Consequently, I’ve always used slang terms; the term “vomit” is so evocatively harsh and nearly onomatopoeic that just hearing it about makes me queasy.

For the Word of the Week, I give you a surprisingly more genteel-yet-still-vulgar term to pretty up a rather unfortunate and ill-mannered event.

Cascade (verb)

1702 from the French cascade (noun). In early 19th century slang, “to vomit.”  Related: cascaded; cascading.

French Generals Retiring on Account of Their Health With Lepaux Presiding in the Directorial Dispensary by James Gillray, 1799.

French Generals Retiring on Account of Their Health With Lepaux Presiding in the Directorial Dispensary by James Gillray, 1799.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luckily for me, I found even more slang terms for cascade to make me laugh rather than turn green:

cast up one’s accounts/cast up one’s reckoning (to vomit)

to cat, shoot the cat, or catting (vomit from drunkenness)

cropsick (having a sickness in the stomach from drunkenness)

to flay a fox/to flea a fox (to vomit)

to flash the hash (cant term, to vomit)

to pump ship (vomit at sea)

The Military Adventures of Johnny Newcombe, with an Account of His Campaign on the Peninsula, and in Pall Mall; Thomas Rowlandson, 1816.

The Military Adventures of Johnny Newcombe, with an Account of His Campaign on the Peninsula, and in Pall Mall; Thomas Rowlandson, 1816.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And now for this week’s winner of the funny but eww! award:

shi**ing through your teeth (vomiting); “Hark ye, friend, have you got a padlock on your a*se, that you sh*te through your teeth?”

Now THAT is a word picture!

A Scene in the Channel; Thomas Rowlandson, 1815.

A Scene in the Channel; Thomas Rowlandson, 1815.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I will leave you with some wonderful naval humor.  I do hope you have absolutely no chance of using this Word of the Week, and that your days remain blessedly hash-free!

Admiral of the Narrow Seas (one who vomits into the lap of the person opposite)

 

All definitions and/or examples taken from Online Etymological DictionaryCant: A Gentleman’s Guide, and/or 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Disguised

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Disguised

Here in the South, you can be drinking – everything from a cold beer with your burger to sipping on a martini at a bar.  You can also be drankin’ – imbibing anything alcoholic while you are thinking about being up to no good.  But once you are drunk, you are either (a) fully-committed to being up to no good or (b) up to no good with your clothes off.

In my first novel, Lord Love a Duke, my heroine gets “drunk to a merry pin” on some medicinal brandy.  In my upcoming release, Earl Crazy, the hero is a light drinker and consequently goes “half seas over” rather quickly while contemplating the tragic idea of getting married.

There are many vulgar terms for “drunk,” but the Word of the Week is by far my favorite.

Disguised (adverb)

drunk; c. 1300, from Old French desguiser (11c.); oldest sense preserved in phrase disguised with liquor (1560s).

Drink sir, is a great provoker of three things….nose painting, sleep and urine. Lechery, sir, it provokes, and unprovokes; it provokes the desire but takes away the performance. (The Porter; Macbeth: Act 2, Scene 3)

Mr. Hurst, disguised and flying the flag of defiance. (from A&E Pride and Prejudice, 1995)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just for fun, here are several synonyms for disguised:

altitudes, boosey, candy, corned, cup-shot, cut, flawd (flawed), flustered, fuddled, groggy, groggified, hocus, lushey, pogy, sucky, top heavy

Mr. Hurst, the completely cup-shot swill tub. (A&E Pride and Prejudice,1995)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other terms and phrases closely related to being disguised, or in the act of becoming disguised:

clear (very drunk)

drunk as a wheel barrow (laying down, sleeping-it-off drunk)

drunk as a lord (drunk, but functioning)

drunk as an emperor (ten times more drunk than a lord)

drunk to a merry pin (slightly elevated with liquor; modern would be buzzed)

half seas over (almost drunk; see also drop in the eye, mellow, and tipsey)

hare (he has swallowed a hare/hair, the hair needs washing down, meaning he is drunk)

hockey (drunk with strong stale beer, called old hock)

in the gun (he is very drunk, likely an allusion to a vessel called a gun that was used for ale in the universities)

maudlin (a crying drunk; perhaps derived from Mary Magdalene, called maudlin as she was always painted with tears)

mauled (extremely drunk)

nazy (drunken)

to buy the sack (to get drunk)

wrapt up in warm flannel (drunk with spirituous liquors)

lady bertram drinking

Lady Bertram will soon be clipping the King’s English.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you chance upon someone who is disguised, feel free to call them:

choice spirit, ensign bearer, fuddle cap, rat (if they get arrested by the watch!), old soaker, surveyor of the highways (reeling drunk), swill tub, toss pot

 

Bonus for the week: drunk as David’s sow

This is a common saying which took its rise from the following: One David Lloyd, a Welchman who kept an alehouse at Hereford, had a living sow with six legs, which was often looked at by the curious.  He also had a wife terribly addicted to drunkenness (for which he sometimes had to give her correction).  One day, David’s wife imbibed one cup too many and, being fearful of the consequences, turned out the sow and lay down herself to sleep in the stye. When visitors came to look at the sow, her husband, presuming it to be in the stye, ushered them in, exclaiming “There is a sow for you! Did you ever see such another?” Some of the company, upon seeing the state of the woman, replied it was the drunkenest sow they had ever beheld. Thereafter the woman was ever called David’s sow. (paraphrased from Grose’s dictionary)

 

Helpful tip for the week: it’s bad manners to invite your friends to a party and then turn it into Dutch Feast (any entertainment where the host gets drunk before the guests).

 

All definitions and/or examples taken from Online Etymological DictionaryCant: A Gentleman’s Guide, and/or 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Mort (4/27/15)

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Mort (4/27/15)

Mort (noun)

woman or wench; also a yeoman’s daughter; when used by itself, denotes a girl or woman of loose morals; canting jargon of unknown origin from at least 1560s

I think it’s fascinating that according to the Oxford English Dictionary, “mort” originally meant a note sounded on a horn at the death of the quarry in a hunt, c 1500, from the French mort, meaning dead, and Latin mortem, meaning death.  How did a word evoking death become co-opted to mean a woman?

1802. British Vessels Described for the Use of Country Gentlemen.

1802. British Vessels Described for the Use of Country Gentlemen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just as we discovered with cove for gentlemen, when you add the right adjective, the character of the mort becomes more apparent:

autem mort (a married woman; also a female beggar who hired or borrowed children for larger gain)

bingo mort (a female dram drinker; one who spirituous liquors in small amounts)

bleached mort (a fair complexioned wench)

dimber mort (a pretty wench)

filching mort (a woman thief)

gentry mort (a gentlewoman)

kinchin mort (a young girl, usually an orphan, trained as a thief)

nazy mort (a drunken woman)

queer mort (a diseased strumpet; also queere mort)

rome or rum mort (a queen or great lady)

strolling mort (beggar or peddler pretending to be a widow)

mort wap-apace (a woman of experience, or very expert at the sport of copulation)

try this lacy

 

 

 

 

See if you can work in a little of the vulgar tongue into your vocabulary this week!

“She’s a dimber mort when dressed in her Sunday finest.”

“She’s nothing but a nazy mort since she decided to spend every weekend at a frat house party.”

 

All definitions and/or examples taken from Online Etymological DictionaryCant: A Gentleman’s Guide, and/or 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.