WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Ale Post

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Ale Post

May 1st – or May Day – is the day that ushers in warmer weather, blooming flowers and trees, buzzing bees, and thoughts (and deeds) of love. People emerge from their homes ready to embrace the outdoors and shake off the gloom and chill of winter.

May Day has its origins, as most celebrations do, in Ancient Rome. The Roman festival of Flora was held from April 28th to May 3rd; Flora was the goddess of fruits and flowers. The festival spread within the Roman sphere of influence, with most European countries having some history of commemorating May Day. Maypoles have likely been in England since Hadrian, and most definitely since Elizabeth, as they were documented by historian John Stow. They were banned for a time, as was Christmas, under the Puritan zeal of Oliver Cromwell, but the Merry Monarch returned them in full glory in 1660. Huzzah!

Country Dances Round a Maypole, Francis Hayman, 1741

Country Dances Round a Maypole, Francis Hayman, 1741

The Maypole Dance grew from these May Day traditions. On May Day, a young tree was cut, then stuck in the ground near the village center. Early dances involved circles of people simply twirling around the pole. This later evolved into people festooning the tree with garlands and ribbons. Each person would hold the end of one ribbon, then dance around the pole and each other, weaving the ribbons together and plaiting them against the pole.

Come Lasses and Lads (Traditional, with a good swing), ca. 1670

Come Lasses and Lads (Traditional, with a good swing), ca. 1670, from The Oxford Song Book

The Raising of the Maypole Outside a City Gate Near a River, Dominique Joseph Vanderburch, Christie's

The Raising of the Maypole Outside a City Gate Near a River, Dominique Joseph Vanderburch, Christie’s

Maypole Dancing was once common around England, with many cities saving their pole from year to year. The tallest Maypole in England was said to have towered over 143 feet in London on The Strand in 1661. It stayed there until 1717, when it was purchased and removed by Sir Isaac Newton. Newton sent the Maypole to Wanstead Park in Essex as a gift to his friend, a Reverend Mr. Pound, where it was used as the support for the (then) largest telescope in Europe at 125 feet in length. The object hadn’t been in its new home for long before an enterprising author attached a poem telling the tale of the fair Maypole.

“Once I adorned the Strand,
But now have found
My way to Pound
On Baron Newton’s land;
Where my aspiring head aloft is reared,
T’ observe the motions of th’ ethereal Lord.
Here sometimes raised a machine by my side,
Through which is seen the sparkling milky tide;
Here oft I’m scented with a balmy dew,
A pleasant blessing which the Strand ne’er knew.
There stood I only to receive abuse,
But here converted to a nobler use;
So that with me all passengers will say,
‘I’m better far than when the Pole of May.”

The Maypole was still common enough to be incorporated into Georgian street slang; hence, the word of the week.

Ale Post (noun)

A may-pole.

Round the Maypole We Go. Regency Era games at the Jane Austen Festival, Canberra, Australia

Round the Maypole We Go. Regency Era games at the Jane Austen Festival, Canberra, Australia

 

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Grinagog or The Cat’s Uncle

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Grinagog or The Cat’s Uncle

Finishing up our month of fools, we come to the slang term I’ve easily incorporated into my everyday speech. A child up to no good will smile madly in effort to distract you from discovering the new worm habitat in his bedroom.

Grinagog

Also known as The Cat’s Uncle. A foolish grinning fellow, one who grins without reason.

Three people drinking punch as a cure for (from right to left) gout, colic, and phthisis. Coloured etching by James Gillray, 1799, Wellcome Library collections.

Three people drinking punch as a cure for (from right to left) gout, colic, and phthisis. Coloured etching by James Gillray, 1799, Wellcome Library collections.

To use more cant, a Grinagog will use his or her grinders (teeth) to full effect.

A French Dentist Shewing a Specimen of His Artificial Teeth and False Palates. Thomas Rowland, 1811, Tate Museum.

A French Dentist Shewing a Specimen of His Artificial Teeth and False Palates. Thomas Rowland, 1811, Tate Museum.

And there’s nothing like the grin of silly fools in full flirt.

A Long Headed Minuet. 1810, Isaac Cruikshank, GJ Savile Caricatures

A Long Headed Minuet. 1810, Isaac Cruikshank, GJ Savile Caricatures

 

Slang term taken from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Coxcomb

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Coxcomb

Last week’s word – Cokes – might have been a contraction of this week’s word:

Coxcomb (noun)

Anciently, a fool. Fools, in great families, wore a cap with bells, on the top of which was a piece of red cloth, in the shape of a cock’s comb. At present, coxcomb signifies a fop, or vain self-conceited fellow.

William Combe wrote a vivid and eloquent description of the coxcomb in The Third Tour of Dr. Syntax, In Search of a Wife.

Canto XXXV of The Third Tour of Dr. Syntax, In Search of a Wife. A Poem. William Combe. 1828.

Canto XXXV of The Third Tour of Dr. Syntax, In Search of a Wife. A Poem. William Combe. 1828.

Georgette Heyer, the grande dame and instigator originator of the Regency romance, also illustrated quite vividly the coxcomb in her novel, Sylvester, or The Wicked Uncle.

Beside Sylvester’s quiet elegance and Major Newbury’s military cut she had been thinking that Sir Nugent presented all the appearance of a coxcomb. He was a tall man, rather willowy in build, by no means unhandsome, but so tightly laced-in at the waist, so exaggeratedly padded at the shoulders, that he looked a little ridiculous. From the striking hat set rakishly on his Corinthian crop (he had already divulged that it was the New Dash, and the latest hit of fashion) to his gleaming boots, everything he wore seemed to have been chosen for the purpose of making him conspicuous. His extravagantly cut coat was embellished with very large and bright buttons; a glimpse of exotic colour hinted at a splended waistcoat beneath it; his breeches were of white corduroy; a diamond pin was stuck in the folds of his preposterous neckcloth; and he wore so many rings on his fingers, and so many fobs and seals dangling at his waist, that he might have been taken for a jeweller advertising his wares. (Chapter 16)

Dandies of 1817, Isaac Cruikshank, British Museum.

Dandies of 1817, Isaac Cruikshank, British Museum.

Slang term definition taken from the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

Read what romance author Barbara Bettis thought of Sylvester, or The Wicked Uncle at The Beau Monde’s Regency Turns 80 celebration article here.

Learn more about Regency coxcombs/dandies and all things fussily masculine at Geri Walton’s unique histories of the 18th and 19th centuries here.

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Cokes

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Cokes

COKES (noun)

The fool in the play of Bartholomew Fair. Perhaps a contraction of the word COXCOMB.

A Pretty Conceit, and worth the finding! I ha’ such luck to spin out these fine things still, and like a Silk-worm, out of my self. Here’s Master Bartholomew Cokes, of Harrow o’ th’ Hill, i’ th’ County of Middlesex, Esquire, takes forth his Licence to marry Mistress Grace Well-born, of the said Place and County: And when do’s he take it forth? to day! the Four and Twentieth of August! Bartholmew-day! Bartholmew upon Bartholmew! there’s the Device! who would have mark’d such a Leap-Frog Chance now? ~Bartholomew Fair, Ben Jonson, Act 1, Scene 1.

The fool part I get. But what is a “Bartholomew Fair?”

It was one of the first Charter fairs – those street celebrations established by Royal Decree. King Henry I granted the land of West Smithfield in London to his former jester and courtier Rahère who, after falling violently ill, had repudiated his sins and made a pilgrimage to Rome, pledging to found a hospital and church for poor men should his health improve. Upon his return to England as a healthy and newly-ordained priest, Rahère established the Priory of the Hospital of St. Bartholomew in 1123, and its resultant fair in 1133.

Rahère, Bouffon de Henry I et de la Reine Matilda (Rahèrem herald to King Henry I), debut 1100, artist unknown.

Rahère, Bouffon de Henry I et de la Reine Matilda (Rahèrem herald to King Henry I), debut 1100, artist unknown.

The original Charter stipulated a three-day event, but by the 17th century it had stretched to a full two weeks; the end of that century saw the time span again altered, shortened to four days. The Fair commenced on August 24th until 1753, when the calendar was changed and the start date moved to September 3.

Bartholomew Fair 1721, publication date estimated 1824, Wellcome Library, London.

Bartholomew Fair 1721, publication date estimated 1824, Wellcome Library, London.

The fair was was both a trading market and entertainment festival. Cloth, food, livestock, and sundry craft items were available for barter or outright purchase. The accompanying displays ranged from the diverting (prize fights, musicians, acrobats, and puppets) to the exploitative (sideshows, freaks, and wild animals).

Advertisement for John Harris's Puppetry Booth, Bartholomew Fair, ca 1700, courtesy Houghton Library at Harvard University.

Advertisement for John Harris’s Puppetry Booth, Bartholomew Fair, ca 1700, courtesy Houghton Library at Harvard University.

Bartholomew fair bill, 1790, courtesy City of London.

Bartholomew fair bill, 1790, courtesy City of London.

Going to Bartholomew Fair sounds as common an occurrence as for those of us in the United States who attend their annual State Fair, or perhaps visit Coney Island in New York. When the appointed time comes, going to the fair is simply what one does – to see and be seen, to witness the extraordinary, to be entertained. Samuel Pepys documented his observations in a diary entry on Saturday the 31st of August, 1667:

… and I to Bartholomew fayre, to walk up and down; and there, among other things, find my Lady Castlemayne at a puppet-play, “Patient Grizill,” and the street full of people expecting her coming out. I confess I did wonder at her courage to come abroad, thinking the people would abuse her; but they, silly people! do not know her work she makes, and therefore suffered her with great respect to take coach, and she away, without any trouble at all, which I wondered at, I confess. I only walked up and down, and, among others, saw Tom Pepys, the turner, who hath a shop, and I think lives in the fair when the fair is not. I only asked how he did as he stood in the street, and so up and down sauntering till late and then home, and there discoursed with my wife of our bad entertainment to-day, and so to bed.

By the middle 19th century, the Bartholomew Fair had become less business expo and more carnival. In 1855 the City of London and Lord Mayor had had enough, and the Bartholomew Fair ended forever, done in by the unruly crowds and rampant crime. It seems the Fair had something for everyone, of every age, and of every walk of life … both legal and illegal.

We could wish, seriously, to caution all young people against a habit of attending fairs. They constitute an assemblage of idle people, where are indiscriminately mixed thieves and pick-pockets, who go from fair to fair; loose women, strolling players, and vagabonds of every description, waiting to plunder the honest part of the people. St. Bartholomew’s fair, from its long continuance, is a school of vice which has initiated more youth into the habits of villainy than even Newgate itself. ~The Newgate Calendar, Comprising Interesting Memoirs of the Most Notorious Characters Who Have Been Convicted of Outrages on the Laws of England Since the Commencement of the Eighteenth Century With Occasional Annecdotes and Observations, Speeches, Confessions, and Last Exclamations of Sufferers, Volume II, by Andrew Knapp and William Baldwin, attorneys at law, 1825.

"Bartholomew Fair" from Microcosm of London, 1808-10, Thomas Rowlandson for Rudolph Ackermann, British Library.

“Bartholomew Fair” from Microcosm of London, 1808-10, Thomas Rowlandson for Rudolph Ackermann, British Library.

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ April Fool

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ April Fool

Last Friday was April 1st, the date known practically the world over as April Fool’s Day. The one day when pranksters can get away with various and sundry harassments and plagues. A celebration of the worldwide “Kick Me” sign.

APRIL FOOL (noun)

Any one imposed on, or sent on a bootless errand, on the first of April; which day it is the custom among the lower people, children, and servants, by dropping empty papers carefully doubled up, sending persons on absurd messages, and such like contrivances, to impose on every one they can, and then to salute them with the title of April Fool. This is also practised in Scotland under the title of Hunting the Gowke.

James Gillray, "The April Fool Consigned to Infamy and Ridicule," 1801, Victoria and Albert Museum.

James Gillray, “The April Fool Consigned to Infamy and Ridicule,” 1801, Victoria and Albert Museum.

Whether its origins can truly be traced back to the Roman Festival of Hilaria or the Medieval Feast of Fools, the first known documented reference to an April Fool is by Geoffrey Chaucer, in the “Nun’s Priest’s Tale” story of his Canterbury Tales in 1392. A wily fox plays on the vanity and conceit of the cock Chauntecleer, and nearly succeeds in having him for dinner.

When that the monthe in which the world bigan
That highte March, whan God first maked man,
Was complet, and passed were also
Syn March bigan thritty dayes and two

Much scholarly debate has centered around whether Chaucer actually meant April 1st or May 3rd; an argument can be made for both interpretations. For the purposes of celebrating all things April Fool, I choose to believe Chaucer went for the historical reference in his tale of torment of the easily gulled.

In 1508, French choirmaster and composter Eloy d’Amerval composed a poem containing a line that roughly translated means “Infamous Mackerel, of many man and many woman, April Fools.” To this day, people shout out “Poisson d’Avril!” Children do so while sticking a picture of a fish on each other’s backs.

maquereau infâme de main d’homme
et de mainte femme,
poisson d’avril.

In 1561, Flemish poet Eduard de Dene penned a poem entitled Refereyn Vp verzendekens dach/Twelck den eersten April te zyne plach. Easy for me to type. The closest meaning translates from late Medieval Dutch means to “Refrain on errand-day/which is the first of April.” In these verses, a nobleman makes his servants run fools’ errands on the first of April. These servants, however, are perhaps less fools and more loyal help: each stanza closes with a servant stating, “I am afraid … that you are trying to make me run a fool’s errand.”

1561dedene

The first British reference to April Fool’s Day appeared in 1686, when John Aubrey in Remaines of Gentilisme and Judaisme simply wrote of “Fooles Holy Day – We observe it on ye first of April.” My favorite documentation of British observance of April trickery comes in the form of invitations to the Annual Ceremony of the Washing of the Lions at the Tower of London. Never mind the fact that there were no lions kept there any longer. Nor were they ever washed.

The premier April Fool's Event - the annual washing of the Tower lions, 1856.

The premier April Fool’s Event – the annual washing of the Tower lions, 1856.

Want to know more about the history of April Fool’s? Check out these fascinating blog posts, and follow them while you’re there!

Origins of April Fools’ Day or France’s April Fish by Geri Walton
The Origin of April Fool’s Day by Regina Jeffers
All About April – Fools and Showers at Jane Austen’s London

 

Slang definition from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue. All other sources used are clickable links in the above text.

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ How to Insult Like the British

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ How to Insult Like the British

My family is off Spring Break-ing, so this week’s cheeky WOW is courtesy of the wit of Anglophenia. Spice up your list of go-to insults this week!

(This is possibly NSFW, if your workplace is infested with a bunch of barmy prigs)

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Staunch Cove

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Staunch Cove

To round out the month of Austen heroes and their slang descriptors, I chose Colonel Brandon.

Colonel Brandon, the friend of Sir John, seemed no more adapted by resemblance of manner to be his friend, than Lady Middleton was to be his wife, or Mrs. Jennings to be Lady Middleton’s mother. He was silent and grave. His appearance however was not unpleasing, in spite of his being in the opinion of Marianne and Margaret an absolute old bachelor, for he was on the wrong side of five and thirty; but though his face was not handsome, his countenance was sensible, and his address was particularly gentlemanlike. (Chapter 7)

Colonel Brandon enters the story quietly, respectfully. He is all that is proper and true, and slowly works his way into the admiration of the Dashwood family – and Marianne in particular – in spite of his sobreity. He is subdued, but still waters run deep, as they say.

Staunch Cove (noun)

A resolute faithful associate, in whom one may place implicit confidence, is said by his palls to be a staunch cove.

Mrs. Jennings was a widow ... She was remarkably quick in the discovery of attachments, and had enjoyed the advantage of raising the blushes and the vanity of many a young lady by insinuations of her power over such a young man; and this kind of discernment enabled her soon after her arrival at Barton decisively to pronounce that Colonel Brandon was very much in love with Marianne Dashwood. She rather suspected it to be so, on the very first evening of their being together, from his listening so attentively while she sang to them. (Chapter 8)

Mrs. Jennings was a widow … She was remarkably quick in the discovery of attachments, and had enjoyed the advantage of raising the blushes and the vanity of many a young lady by insinuations of her power over such a young man; and this kind of discernment enabled her soon after her arrival at Barton decisively to pronounce that Colonel Brandon was very much in love with Marianne Dashwood. She rather suspected it to be so, on the very first evening of their being together, from his listening so attentively while she sang to them. (Chapter 8)

Colonel Brandon's partiality for Marianne, which had so early been discovered by his friends, now first became perceptible to Elinor, when it ceased to be noticed by them. Their attention and wit were drawn off to his more fortunate rival; and the raillery which the other had incurred before any partiality arose, was removed when his feelings began really to call for the ridicule so justly annexed to sensibility. (Chapter 10)

Colonel Brandon’s partiality for Marianne, which had so early been discovered by his friends, now first became perceptible to Elinor, when it ceased to be noticed by them. Their attention and wit were drawn off to his more fortunate rival; and the raillery which the other had incurred before any partiality arose, was removed when his feelings began really to call for the ridicule so justly annexed to sensibility. (Chapter 10)

She saw it with concern; for what could a silent man of five and thirty hope, when opposed to a very lively one of five and twenty? and as she could not even wish him successful, she heartily wished him indifferent. She liked him—in spite of his gravity and reserve, she beheld in him an object of interest. His manners, though serious, were mild; and his reserve appeared rather the result of some oppression of spirits than of any natural gloominess of temper. Sir John had dropped hints of past injuries and disappointments, which justified her belief of his being an unfortunate man, and she regarded him with respect and compassion. (Chapter 10)

She saw it with concern; for what could a silent man of five and thirty hope, when opposed to a very lively one of five and twenty? and as she could not even wish him successful, she heartily wished him indifferent. She liked him—in spite of his gravity and reserve, she beheld in him an object of interest. His manners, though serious, were mild; and his reserve appeared rather the result of some oppression of spirits than of any natural gloominess of temper. Sir John had dropped hints of past injuries and disappointments, which justified her belief of his being an unfortunate man, and she regarded him with respect and compassion. (Chapter 10)

Colonel Brandon came in while the party were at tea, and by his manner of looking round the room for Marianne, Elinor immediately fancied that he neither expected nor wished to see her there, and, in short, that he was already aware of what occasioned her absence. (Chapter 30)

Colonel Brandon came in while the party were at tea, and by his manner of looking round the room for Marianne, Elinor immediately fancied that he neither expected nor wished to see her there, and, in short, that he was already aware of what occasioned her absence. (Chapter 30)

The event proved her conjecture right, though it was founded on injustice and error; for Colonel Brandon DID come in; and Elinor, who was convinced that solicitude for Marianne brought him thither, and who saw THAT solicitude in his disturbed and melancholy look, and in his anxious though brief inquiry after her, could not forgive her sister for esteeming him so lightly. (Chapter 31)

The event proved her conjecture right, though it was founded on injustice and error; for Colonel Brandon DID come in; and Elinor, who was convinced that solicitude for Marianne brought him thither, and who saw THAT solicitude in his disturbed and melancholy look, and in his anxious though brief inquiry after her, could not forgive her sister for esteeming him so lightly. (Chapter 31)

Colonel Brandon's delicate, unobtrusive enquiries were never unwelcome to Miss Dashwood. He had abundantly earned the privilege of intimate discussion of her sister's disappointment, by the friendly zeal with which he had endeavoured to soften it, and they always conversed with confidence. His chief reward for the painful exertion of disclosing past sorrows and present humiliations, was given in the pitying eye with which Marianne sometimes observed him, and the gentleness of her voice whenever (though it did not often happen) she was obliged, or could oblige herself to speak to him. THESE assured him that his exertion had produced an increase of good-will towards himself, and THESE gave Elinor hopes of its being farther augmented hereafter... (Chapter 32)

Colonel Brandon’s delicate, unobtrusive enquiries were never unwelcome to Miss Dashwood. He had abundantly earned the privilege of intimate discussion of her sister’s disappointment, by the friendly zeal with which he had endeavoured to soften it, and they always conversed with confidence. His chief reward for the painful exertion of disclosing past sorrows and present humiliations, was given in the pitying eye with which Marianne sometimes observed him, and the gentleness of her voice whenever (though it did not often happen) she was obliged, or could oblige herself to speak to him. THESE assured him that his exertion had produced an increase of good-will towards himself, and THESE gave Elinor hopes of its being farther augmented hereafter… (Chapter 32)

Elinor perceived with alarm that she was not quite herself, and, while attempting to soothe her, eagerly felt her pulse. It was lower and quicker than ever! and Marianne, still talking wildly of mama, her alarm increased so rapidly, as to determine her on sending instantly for Mr. Harris, and despatching a messenger to Barton for her mother. To consult with Colonel Brandon on the best means of effecting the latter, was a thought which immediately followed the resolution of its performance; and as soon she had rung up the maid to take her place by her sister, she hastened down to the drawing-room, where she knew he was generally to be found at a much later hour than the present. (Chapter 43)

Elinor perceived with alarm that she was not quite herself, and, while attempting to soothe her, eagerly felt her pulse. It was lower and quicker than ever! and Marianne, still talking wildly of mama, her alarm increased so rapidly, as to determine her on sending instantly for Mr. Harris, and despatching a messenger to Barton for her mother. To consult with Colonel Brandon on the best means of effecting the latter, was a thought which immediately followed the resolution of its performance; and as soon she had rung up the maid to take her place by her sister, she hastened down to the drawing-room, where she knew he was generally to be found at a much later hour than the present. (Chapter 43)

HE, meanwhile, whatever he might feel, acted with all the firmness of a collected mind, made every necessary arrangement with the utmost despatch, and calculated with exactness the time in which she might look for his return. Not a moment was lost in delay of any kind. The horses arrived, even before they were expected, and Colonel Brandon only pressing her hand with a look of solemnity, and a few words spoken too low to reach her ear, hurried into the carriage. (Chapter 43)

HE, meanwhile, whatever he might feel, acted with all the firmness of a collected mind, made every necessary arrangement with the utmost despatch, and calculated with exactness the time in which she might look for his return. Not a moment was lost in delay of any kind. The horses arrived, even before they were expected, and Colonel Brandon only pressing her hand with a look of solemnity, and a few words spoken too low to reach her ear, hurried into the carriage. (Chapter 43)

Marianne's illness, though weakening in its kind, had not been long enough to make her recovery slow; and with youth, natural strength, and her mother's presence in aid, it proceeded so smoothly as to enable her to remove, within four days after the arrival of the latter, into Mrs. Palmer's dressing-room. When there, at her own particular request, for she was impatient to pour forth her thanks to him for fetching her mother, Colonel Brandon was invited to visit her. His emotion on entering the room, in seeing her altered looks, and in receiving the pale hand which she immediately held out to him, was such, as, in Elinor's conjecture, must arise from something more than his affection for Marianne, or the consciousness of its being known to others; and she soon discovered in his melancholy eye and varying complexion as he looked at her sister, the probable recurrence of many past scenes of misery to his mind, brought back by that resemblance between Marianne and Eliza already acknowledged, and now strengthened by the hollow eye, the sickly skin, the posture of reclining weakness, and the warm acknowledgment of peculiar obligation (Chapter 46)

Marianne’s illness, though weakening in its kind, had not been long enough to make her recovery slow; and with youth, natural strength, and her mother’s presence in aid, it proceeded so smoothly as to enable her to remove, within four days after the arrival of the latter, into Mrs. Palmer’s dressing-room. When there, at her own particular request, for she was impatient to pour forth her thanks to him for fetching her mother, Colonel Brandon was invited to visit her.
His emotion on entering the room, in seeing her altered looks, and in receiving the pale hand which she immediately held out to him, was such, as, in Elinor’s conjecture, must arise from something more than his affection for Marianne, or the consciousness of its being known to others; and she soon discovered in his melancholy eye and varying complexion as he looked at her sister, the probable recurrence of many past scenes of misery to his mind, brought back by that resemblance between Marianne and Eliza already acknowledged, and now strengthened by the hollow eye, the sickly skin, the posture of reclining weakness, and the warm acknowledgment of peculiar obligation (Chapter 46)

Marianne Dashwood was born to an extraordinary fate. She was born to discover the falsehood of her own opinions, and to counteract, by her conduct, her most favourite maxims. She was born to overcome an affection formed so late in life as at seventeen, and with no sentiment superior to strong esteem and lively friendship, voluntarily to give her hand to another!—and THAT other, a man who had suffered no less than herself under the event of a former attachment, whom, two years before, she had considered too old to be married,—and who still sought the constitutional safeguard of a flannel waistcoat! (Chapter 50)

Marianne Dashwood was born to an extraordinary fate. She was born to discover the falsehood of her own opinions, and to counteract, by her conduct, her most favourite maxims. She was born to overcome an affection formed so late in life as at seventeen, and with no sentiment superior to strong esteem and lively friendship, voluntarily to give her hand to another!—and THAT other, a man who had suffered no less than herself under the event of a former attachment, whom, two years before, she had considered too old to be married,—and who still sought the constitutional safeguard of a flannel waistcoat! (Chapter 50)

Colonel Brandon was now as happy, as all those who best loved him, believed he deserved to be;—in Marianne he was consoled for every past affliction;—her regard and her society restored his mind to animation, and his spirits to cheerfulness; and that Marianne found her own happiness in forming his, was equally the persuasion and delight of each observing friend. Marianne could never love by halves; and her whole heart became, in time, as much devoted to her husband, as it had once been to Willoughby. (Chapter 50)

Colonel Brandon was now as happy, as all those who best loved him, believed he deserved to be;—in Marianne he was consoled for every past affliction;—her regard and her society restored his mind to animation, and his spirits to cheerfulness; and that Marianne found her own happiness in forming his, was equally the persuasion and delight of each observing friend. Marianne could never love by halves; and her whole heart became, in time, as much devoted to her husband, as it had once been to Willoughby. (Chapter 50)

 

Slang definition from Cant: A Gentleman’s Guide by Stephen Hart at Pascal Bonefant.