WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Screeve

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Screeve

I stumbled on a wonderful video of what some call a Pride and Prejudice parody, and while I can see several instances of comparison with adaptations of that novel, I would more directly call it a period drama parody. The video combines elements from pretty much all the Jane Austen books, plus any Georgian drama you can call to mind as you watch it.

It aired originally as a Christmas Day special way back in 2000, but doesn’t look terribly dated despite that being twenty years ago(!). The production rivals any full-length period drama; it was filmed at Squerryes Court in Westerham, Kent, a 17th Century manor house that was also used in the 2009 Emma adaptation and for the Battle of Agincourt in the 2012 BBC series, The Hollow Crown. It also features exquisite costuming, dialog worthy of Austen, and enough hand- and kerchief-wringing to make Mrs. Bennet seem tame.

The cast is top-tier for a show that runs less than ten minutes: Alan Rickman (I still get teary over his passing), Richard E. Grant, Pete Postlethwaite, Imelda Staunton, Honeysuckle Weeks, Geraldine McEwan, Victoria Wood (who wrote the screenplay), and James Bolam, to name the ones I recognized. I especially enjoyed the exchange of letters (hence my choice for the Word of the Week), with the addition of a sweepstakes chance a nice, spoofy touch.

Oh, and the title? Plots and Proposals.

Screeve

A letter, or written paper.

Victoria Wood has written and starred in many pastiches. If you enjoyed this one, head to YouTube, search for her name, and prepare to be entertained.

 

Slang term taken from Cant: A Gentleman’s Guide. The Language of Rogues in Georgian London, by Stephen Hart.

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Man of the World

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Man of the World

For eleven weeks, nothing but quarantine. For the last three weeks, total craziness with a board meeting, graduation, and teen ball – all with the restrictions of social distancing, massive disinfection protocols, massive temperature-taking, masking (and the fighting over requiring/requesting thereof), and all the planning that went into pulling those events together.

Now, because people seemed to think the virus had an expiration date issued by government officials, and it was okay to resume partying like it was 1999, my state is enjoying a resurgence of positive viral cases. <insert your personal political/medical/conspiracy theories here>

I beg your indulgence for this weak Word of the Week. I really need to decompress and vegetate for a day or three. The graphic below is super awesome though.

Man of the World

A knowing man.

If you’d like to be a Man (or better, Person; or best, They) of the world, look no further than this phenomenal poster created in 1931 by John B. Sparks. His history may have ended nearly 100 years ago, but it began 4000 years prior to that. Aesthetically, it’s gorgeous. Too bad some of the information contained therein is positively ugly.

The Histomap: Four Thousand Years of World History, by John B. Sparks, 1931, via Visual Capitalist.

Prefer a clickable, zoomable map? Head to the David Rumsey Map Collection.

 

Slang term taken from the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.