WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Rum Chant

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Rum Chant

When you’ve started back teaching school, your kid has all four wisdom teeth taken out, and a hurricane comes to visit despite the fact that you live 350 from the Gulf of Mexico…. all in one week. Yeah.

When you have one of those weeks, you get punchy and listen to music and write alternate lyrics. And then use them for a blog post.

I’m so, so sorry.

Rum Chant

A song.

It’s a Regency debutante and the rules of Society to which she must abide meets Lady Gaga song from the 21st Century. Plus a cold orthodontist waiting room. And too little sleep. Way too little sleep.

Again, my sincerest apologies. You should really leave now.

I present, Proper Face, sung to the music of Poker Face by Lady Gaga.

Mum-mum-mum-mah
Mum-mum-mum-mah
Mum-mum-mum-mah
Mum-mum-mum-mah
Mum-mum-mum-mah

I want it to be like when we’re waltzing, please
Touch him, let him, breathe him, stare at him stare at me (I love it)
Love games despite chaperones try to make me play my part
I flirt and banter to tempt my way to his heart

Oh, oh, oh, oh, ohhhh, oh-oh-e-oh-oh-oh
I’ll get him hooked, show him my best looks
Oh, oh, oh, oh, ohhhh, oh-oh-e-oh-oh-oh,
I’ll get him hot, show him what I’ve got

Can’t read my, can’t read my
No they can’t read my proper face
(she’s not Lady Anyody)
Can’t read my, can’t read my
No they can’t read past my proper face
(she’s not Lady Anybody)

P-p-p-proper face, p-p-proper face
(Mum-mum-mum-mah)
P-p-p-proper face, p-p-proper face
(Mum-mum-mum-mah)

I want to marry him a love match we will be
A little naughtiness is fun when you’re with me (I love it)
Behind my mask I hide a wealth of mystery
Only for you to see and not Society (just you and me)

Oh, oh, oh, oh, ohhhh, oh-oh-e-oh-oh-oh
I’ll get him hooked, show him my best looks
Oh, oh, oh, oh, ohhhh, oh-oh-e-oh-oh-oh,
I’ll get him hot, show him what I’ve got

Can’t read my, can’t read my
No they can’t read my proper face
(she’s not Lady Anybody)
Can’t read my, can’t read my
No they can’t read past my proper face
(she’s not Lady Anybody)

P-p-p-proper face, p-p-proper face
(Mum mum mum mah)
P-p-p-proper face, p-p-proper face
(Mum mum mum mah)

I won’t tell you that I love you
Kiss or hug you
Cause I’m waiting, anticipating
I’m not lying, I’m just baiting with my love-game-creating
Unlike the match-making mamas
Pushing awful daughters on you
I promise this, promise this
What you see’s not even the best bit

Can’t read my, can’t read my
No they can’t read my proper face
(she’s not Lady Anybody)
Can’t read my, can’t read my
No they can’t read past my proper face
(she’s not Lady Anybody)

Can’t read my, can’t read my
No they can’t read my proper face
(she’s not Lady Anybody)
Can’t read my, can’t read my
No they can’t read past my proper face
(she’s not Lady Anybody)

Can’t read my, can’t read my
No they can’t read my proper face
(she’s not Lady Anybody)
Can’t read my, can’t read my
No they can’t read past my proper face
(she’s not Lady Anybody)

P-p-p-proper face, p-p-proper face
P-p-p-proper face, p-p-proper face
(she’s not Lady Anybody)

P-p-p-proper face, p-p-proper face
P-p-p-proper face, p-p-proper face
P-p-p-proper face, p-p-proper face
P-p-p-proper face, p-p-proper face

 

Slang term taken from the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Red Letter Day

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Red Letter Day

At the risk of seeming sacrilegious, this week’s word (or phrase, actually), fit too well. I will also admit that the Word of the Week applies only to the holiday and not to the subject of my post. My brain, alas, is on early holiday, it seems.

We Americans cherish our holidays, grasping at them as if they are life preservers tossed into the sea and we are drowning. Personally, I loathe Monday holidays. They make the rest of my week seem off-kilter and somehow longer despite one less work day. I blame math.

Red Letter Day

A saint’s day or holiday, marked in the calendars with red letters. Red letter men; Roman Catholics: from their observation of the saint days marked in red letters.

Labor Day in the US is the perfect time to take a break from my obsession with William Hogarth and look at social hierarchy during the Regency period. Why? I have no idea, other than the fact that I have the print below by Isaac Cruikshank and it caught my eye.

The Regency Era was marked by the rise of a larger middle class as well as cries for relief from the impoverished workers – among other social alterations – but the dividing lines between and compositions of the classes remained relatively unchanged, for all that this was an era of enlightenment and progress. There were plenty who tried to maneuver themselves up a level or two (those grasping cits), and indeed a few more rungs were added to the ladder, but the overall structure of the classes in society remained static.

They were in fact very fine ladies; not deficient in good humour when they were pleased, nor in the power of making themselves agreeable when they chose it, but proud and conceited. They were rather handsome, had been educated in one of the first private seminaries in town, had a fortune of twenty thousand pounds, were in the habit of spending more than they ought, and of associating with people of rank, and were therefore in every respect entitled to think well of themselves, and meanly of others. They were of a respectable family in the north of England; a circumstance more deeply impressed on their memories than that their brother’s fortune and their own had been acquired by trade.
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 4

The Quality Ladder by Isaac Cruikshank, 1793, Yale University Library Digital Collections, Lewis Walpole Library.

For a less satirical picture of life on the ladder of society, the minds at Hierarchy Structure have a helpful chart. Although I will admit, I can totally picture the Bingley sisters knocking ladies down in their mad quest to reach the top rung of Cruikshank’s staircase.

Regency Period Social Hierarchy from HierarchyStructure.com

“In marrying your nephew, I should not consider myself as quitting that sphere. He is a gentleman; I am a gentleman’s daughter; so far we are equal.”
Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 56

You tell her, Elizabeth. Preach.