WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Hobberdehoy

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Hobberdehoy

I think we all know someone who needs to act their age rather than their shoe size (to paraphrase Prince). This week’s word may be more a literal reference to age rather than behavior, but it’s easier to illustrate the latter, so I beg your indulgence of my interpretation.

Hobberdehoy (noun)

Half a man and half a boy, a lad between both.

For the ultimate Regency boy-man, I of course thought of the Prince Regent, the patron saint of leisure, fashion, and food, and extravagance in all three. He was criticized as selfish, careless, and inconstant, offering no direction to the country during his father’s incapacitation or the wars with Napoleon and America. His legacy is self-aggrandizement for all things frivolous and profligate.

George IV by Thomas Lawrence, 1822, Chatsworth House Chintz Bedroom.

George IV by Thomas Lawrence, 1822, Chatsworth House Chintz Bedroom.

The remaining behavioral visual aids for Hobberdehoys may be fictional – but they fit my thematic rendering rather well. And of course they came from the inspired mind of Jane Austen. Upon examination, I found a Hobberdehoy in each of her novels.

Do you agree with my choices?

Allesandro Nivola as Henry Crawford in Mansfield Park, 1999.

Allesandro Nivola as Henry Crawford in Mansfield Park, 1999.

Rupert Evans as Frank Churchill in Emma.

Rupert Evans as Frank Churchill in Emma, 2009.

William Beck as John Thorpe in Northanger Abbey, 2007.

William Beck as John Thorpe in Northanger Abbey, 2007.

Anthony Head as Sir Walter Elliot in Persuasion, 2007.

Anthony Head as Sir Walter Elliot in Persuasion, 2007.

Greg Wise as Willoughby in Sense and Sensibility, 1995.

Greg Wise as Willoughby in Sense and Sensibility, 1995.

Adrian Lukis as George Wickham in Pride and Prejudice, 1995.

Adrian Lukis as George Wickham in Pride and Prejudice, 1995.

 

Slang term taken from the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

Frivolous Friday ~ The Persuasion of Captain Wentworth

Frivolous Friday ~ The Persuasion of Captain Wentworth

I readily admit to being easily amused, and GIFs are a delightful diversion. What better way to usher in the weekend than with a completely frivolous, utterly unnecessary, and probably insipid post telling the story of Persuasion via quotes and Captain Wentworth GIFs.

“We live at home, quiet, confined, and our feelings prey upon us.” Chapter 23

 

 

 

 

 

 

“No: the years which had destroyed her youth and bloom had only given him a more glowing, manly, open look, in no respect lessening his personal advantages. She had seen the same Frederick Wentworth.” Chapter 7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“His cold politeness, his ceremonious grace, were worse than anything.” Chapter 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“She had thought only of avoiding Captain Wentworth… ” Chapter 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Now they were as strangers; nay worse than strangers, for they could never become acquainted.” Chapter 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The evening ended with dancing. On its being proposed, Anne offered her services, as usual, and though her eyes would sometimes fill with tears as she sat at the instrument, she was extremely glad to be employed, and desired nothing in return but to be unobserved.” Chapter 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“You pierce my soul.” Chapter 23

 

 

 

 

 

“I am half agony, half hope.” Chapter 23

 

 

 

 

 

“Thus much indeed he was obliged to acknowledge – that he had been constant unconsciously, nay unintentionally; that he had meant to forget her, and believed it to be done.” Chapter 23

 

“He had imagined himself indifferent, when he had only been angry; and he had been unjust to her merits, because he had been a sufferer from them.” Chapter 23

 

“What! Would I be turned back from doing a thing that I had determined to do, and that I knew to be right, by the airs and interference of such a person, or any person I may say?” Chapter 23

 

"No, I have no idea of being so easily persuaded. When I have made up my mind, I have made it.”

“No, I have no idea of being so easily persuaded. When I have made up my mind, I have made it.” Chapter 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Dare not say that a man forgets sooner than a woman, that his love has an earlier death.” Chapter 23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“There could have never been two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison, no countenances so beloved.” Chapter 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“…when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure.” Chapter 20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“There, he had seen every thing to exalt in his estimation the woman he had lost, and there begun to deplore the pride, the folly, the madness of resentment, which had kept him from trying to regain her when thrown in his way.” Chapter 23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“You alone have brought me to Bath. For you alone, I think and plan. Have you not seen this?” Chapter 23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“A word, a look, will be enough to decide whether I enter your father’s house this evening or never.” Chapter 23

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Who can be in doubt of what followed? When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other’s ultimate comfort.” Chapter 24