WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Nicknacks

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Nicknacks

I’m a homeschool mom, so it’s that time of year when I start thinking that it’s that time of year for me to start thinking that I should really start thinking about getting our year together.

Sometimes it’s just difficult to get motivated. This year I’m fortunate enough to be able to blame COVID19. For everything. 🎉🎉

In the spirit of procrastination, I’ve fallen down the well of Jane Austen tumblrs. There are worse wells to be hiding researching in.

Nicknacks

Toys, baubles, or curiosities.

Welcome to the world of The Other Austen, where you can find yourself amused for hours — nay days. There I discovered a link to A Corner of My Mind, with these fantastically cute paper dolls of all the Austen heroes.

You are very welcome.

Paper Doll of Mr. Knightley from A Corner of My Mind.

Paper Doll of Henry Tilney from A Corner of My Mind.

Paper Doll of Mr. Darcy from A Corner of My Mind.

Paper Doll of Capt. Wentworth from A Corner of My Mind. Am I the only one who wishes one of his outfits was a naval uniform?

Paper Doll of Edward Ferrars from A Corner of My Mind.

Paper Doll of Edmund Bertram from A Corner of My Mind.

 

  • Slang term taken from the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.
  • You can find more outfits for your paper dolls, if you’re so inclined, at Jane Austen’s Hero Club.
  • Speaking of homeschooling, learn how to create your own paper dolls in the post Paper Dolls Through the Ages at Practical Pages. Because we’re all crafty during quarantine.
  • Jo Manning wrote a fantastic guest piece at Number One London about Donald Hendricks, the man behind the beautiful Jane Austen paper doll characters above (more than just the heroes, too). He also did the March sisters from Little Women, as well as other literary figures, celebrities, and artists.
WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Clerked

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Clerked

This week’s word brought to you by the wonderfully expressive Mr. Knightley.

Clerked

Soothed, funned, imposed on. “The cull will not be clerked;” i.e. the fellow will not be imposed on by fair words.

“Surprises are foolish things. The pleasure is not enhanced, and the inconvenience is often considerable.”
Volume II, Chapter 8, Emma

“Not your vain spirit, but your serious spirit. –If one leads you wrong, I am sure the other tells you of it.”
Volume III, Chapter 2, Emma

“There is one thing, Emma, which a man can always do, if he chuses, and that is, his duty; not by manoeuvring and finessing, but by vigour and resolution. It is Frank Churchill’s duty to pay this attention to his father. He knows it to be so, by his promises and messages; but if he wished to do it, it might be done.”
Volume II, Chapter 18, Emma

“Upon my word, Emma, to hear you abusing the reason you have, is almost enough to make me think so too. Better be without sense, than misapply it as you do.”
Volume I, Chapter 8, Emma

“Emma, I must once more speak to you as I have been used to do: a privilege rather endured than allowed, perhaps, but I must still use it. I cannot see you acting wrong, without a remonstrance. How could you be so unfeeling to Miss Bates? How could you be so insolent in your wit to a woman of her character, age, and situation?—Emma, I had not thought it possible.”
Volume III, Chapter 7, Emma

“Men of sense, whatever you may chuse to say, do not want silly wives.”
Volume I, Chapter 8, Emma

“Vanity working on a weak head, produces every sort of mischief.”
Volume I, Chapter 8, Emma

Mr. Knightley – Can I get a witness, please?!

 

  • Slang term taken from the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.
  • The above quotes are from the Jane Austen novel Emma, but are not matched to the gif scenes from the BBC/PBS miniseries Emma starring Jonny Lee Miller and Romola Garai from 2010. I just liked the quotes and JLM’s expressions. Apologies if this sets off anyone’s need for matchiness.