WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Nug

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Nug

It’s February.

It may still be cold and wintry, but love is in the air, so things are heating up, of a fashion.

February hosts the most loved and despised of holidays – Valentine’s Day. Every year, more than 36 million heart-shaped boxes of chocolate are sold across the United States. Heck, even 9 million people buy something for their pets. But take a stroll through social media anywhere near February 14th to find out what your single friends think of the so-called “love month.”

They just need to find themselves a Word of the Week.

Nug

An endearing word: as, My dear nug; my dear love.

Oh! Listen to the Voice of Love, James Gillray, 1799, National Portrait Gallery.

And here’s one’s dearest nug…at least prior to marriage.

Harmony Before Matrimony, James Gillray, 1805, British Museum.

 

Advertisements
WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Cold Pudding

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Cold Pudding

Hello, February.

The second month of the year in our Gregorian calendar, the only month with less than thirty days, and the only month whose name means both ‘Day of Purification’ (dies februatus, in Latin) and ‘Mud Month’ (Solmonath, in Old English). February’s flower is the violet and its birthstone the amethyst, the symbol of piety, humility, spiritual wisdom, and sincerity. It’s also the month crammed full with such random holidays as National Freedom Day (1st), checking groundhogs for shadows (2nd), eating/drinking/merrying for Mardi Gras (13th), Chinese New Year (17th, et. al.), commemorating the birthdays of two Presidents (19th), and Rare Disease Day (28th). According to Holidays Calendar, there are over 160 things you can observe, celebrate, or just ponder during the month of February.

How on earth did February come to hold the responsibility for all things love? And since Ash Wednesday falls on Valentine’s Day this year, will anyone give up chocolate for Lent? Especially since my favorite day in February is the 15th, when Valentine’s candy goes 75% off at Target.

Thou hast no shame in the discount candy game.

It’s interesting to me that the shortest month of the year commemorates the very emotion that is supposed to encompass people wholly, truly, and 4-ever. Valentine’s Day falls smack in the middle of this month of amour – the same day every year – and yet stores are still overrun at 5:00pm that day with males desperate to find something their loves will find worthy.

The Pearl Necklace by Frédéric Soulacroix (1858-1933), Art Renewal Center, New Jersey.

Might I suggest the word of the week?

Cold Pudding

This is said to settle one’s love.

Perhaps a little poetry wouldn’t go amiss. And chocolate. Must have all the chocolate.

The Lovers’ Tryst by Frédéric Soulacroix (1858-1933), Bonhams Gallery, London.

 

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Sweet Heart

WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Sweet Heart

Love comes in all stages of life. It’s cute when we see the tiny ringer bearer and flower girl peck each other’s cheeks with kisses at the wedding. It’s heartwarming to see the elderly lady and gentleman holding hands at the nursing home.

Sweet Heart (noun)

Late 13th Century, as a form of address. By the 1570s, as a synonym for “loved one.” From sweet (adjective) and heart (noun).
Slang. A term applicable to either the masculine or feminine gender, signifying a girl’s lover, or a man’s mistress: derived from a sweet cake in the shape of a heart.

Some historical Sweet Hearts.

Le Parapluie Officieux, Le Bon Genre No. 40, circa 1820.

Le Parapluie Officieux, Le Bon Genre No. 40, circa 1820.

A Kiss In The Kitchen by Thomas Rowlandson

A Kiss In The Kitchen by Thomas Rowlandson

Forgiving Lovers, Thomas Rowlandson, 1798.

Forgiving Lovers, Thomas Rowlandson, 1798.

Aged Lovers, Thomas Rowlandson, 1798.

Aged Lovers, Thomas Rowlandson, 1798.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historical definition from The Online Etymological Dictionary. Slang definition from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.