WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Pucker

Hello, October.

The month when pumpkin-flavored everything debuts, and seventy-five percent of the television channels air back-to-back scary movies. It’s actually one of  my favorite times of the year. The scary part more than the pumpkin part. I’m no fan of gore or outrageous violence, but I do enjoy a good fright! I love suspenseful music, dark alleys and houses, and things that go bump in the night.

But what disquieted people during the Regency? The things that seem terrifying now – the disdain for bathing, absence of modern plumbing, and putrid cities – were normal occurrences for the residents of the 19th Century. If we look to publications during that time, however, we find a decided preoccupation with the gothic, the paranormal, and the downright demonic. Jane Austen even cited seven horrid novels that stir the blood and disturb the senses.

The public just had to know what all the fuss was about, no matter in what state the books left them.

Catherine Moreland reads a horrid novel by candlelight - the better to stir up her dreams. Felicity Jones in the ITV production of Northanger Abbey, 2007.

Catherine Moreland reads a horrid novel by candlelight – the better to stir up her dreams. Or nightmares. Felicity Jones in the ITV production of Northanger Abbey, 2007.

 

 

Pucker (adjective)

In a fright; also in dishabille. She was all in a pucker, or in a terrible pucker: she was alarmed, scared.

For your October delectation, I present The Northanger Abbey horrid novels, as recommended by Isabella Thorpe. Click the covers below to learn more…if you dare!

castle of wolfenbach

clermont

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the mysterious warning

necromancer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

midnight bell

orphanof the rhine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

horrid mysteries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All definitions and/or examples taken from the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

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