WOW ~ Word of the Week ~ Cascade

Since last week was all about being disguised, aka drunk, this week naturally lent itself to the after effects of said drunkenness: getting sick.  I am one who would rather visit the dentist every day for a month than throw up.  When I was a child, I even avoided using medical terms for the action, almost superstitiously believing if I didn’t say the actual word out loud, maybe I would avoid the unpleasant results.  Consequently, I’ve always used slang terms; the term “vomit” is so evocatively harsh and nearly onomatopoeic that just hearing it about makes me queasy.

For the Word of the Week, I give you a surprisingly more genteel-yet-still-vulgar term to pretty up a rather unfortunate and ill-mannered event.

Cascade (verb)

1702 from the French cascade (noun). In early 19th century slang, “to vomit.”  Related: cascaded; cascading.

French Generals Retiring on Account of Their Health With Lepaux Presiding in the Directorial Dispensary by James Gillray, 1799.

French Generals Retiring on Account of Their Health With Lepaux Presiding in the Directorial Dispensary by James Gillray, 1799.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luckily for me, I found even more slang terms for cascade to make me laugh rather than turn green:

cast up one’s accounts/cast up one’s reckoning (to vomit)

to cat, shoot the cat, or catting (vomit from drunkenness)

cropsick (having a sickness in the stomach from drunkenness)

to flay a fox/to flea a fox (to vomit)

to flash the hash (cant term, to vomit)

to pump ship (vomit at sea)

The Military Adventures of Johnny Newcombe, with an Account of His Campaign on the Peninsula, and in Pall Mall; Thomas Rowlandson, 1816.

The Military Adventures of Johnny Newcombe, with an Account of His Campaign on the Peninsula, and in Pall Mall; Thomas Rowlandson, 1816.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And now for this week’s winner of the funny but eww! award:

shi**ing through your teeth (vomiting); “Hark ye, friend, have you got a padlock on your a*se, that you sh*te through your teeth?”

Now THAT is a word picture!

A Scene in the Channel; Thomas Rowlandson, 1815.

A Scene in the Channel; Thomas Rowlandson, 1815.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I will leave you with some wonderful naval humor.  I do hope you have absolutely no chance of using this Word of the Week, and that your days remain blessedly hash-free!

Admiral of the Narrow Seas (one who vomits into the lap of the person opposite)

 

All definitions and/or examples taken from Online Etymological DictionaryCant: A Gentleman’s Guide, and/or 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

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